Shanghai (Finally) Embraces Adaptive Reuse

October 10, 2011 § Leave a comment

With our work extending globally, some of us recently traveled to China. What we found was fascinating: a fully-functioning identity crisis where thousands of years of tradition coexist with modern thought in a unique urban community that is evolving in fast-forward.

We spent the majority of our time in Shanghai, which, due to China’s recent economic boom, is developing at a dizzying rate. In the 1950’s, the urban area of Shanghai was 82.4 square kilometers; now, it is approximately 3924.24 square kilometers and growing. In 60 years, it has multiplied almost 50 times! This rapid development has often caused the city to cut corners, which has resulted in the demolition of many high-quality old buildings to make way for crudely constructed new ones. The city has been virtually scraped clean of any of its architectural history, but there are some notable exceptions.
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Adaptive Reuse: Green Space as a Tool for Neighborhood Revitalization

May 2, 2011 § 1 Comment


The latest edition of Buildipedia features 4th+Linden in an article about adaptive reuse. Read it below, or view it with before/after slideshows here.

Adaptive Reuse: Green Space as a Tool for Neighborhood Revitalization
Written by Tara D. Sturm

For many reasons, adaptive reuse projects are great for the environment. Using already existing buildings instead of building new reduces waste, requires less energy, and scales down the general consumption of materials. This green space has farther reaching effects, particularly fostering a greater sense of community and neighborhood revitalization. We talked with Alan Pullman of architectural firm Studio One Eleven about a recent adaptive reuse project located in an emerging Long Beach, California, neighborhood.

The original space at 4th + Linden was a large, derelict warehouse with little to offer the surrounding area. With a bit of creativity and a reshaping of the space, however, the firm was able to not only revitalize the building itself but also catalyze change and engage the community for results that exceeded their hopes and expectations.
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4th + Linden in Form Magazine

February 7, 2011 § Leave a comment

This month’s Form Magazine features an article about Studio One Eleven’s 4th + Linden project. Read an excerpt below, or view the entire article here.

BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Rather than wait for clients to put a project on the table, leadership at Studio One Eleven in Long Beach, California, took matters into their own hands. Seeking a new space for their offices, the architecture and urban design firm located an ideal opportunity in the midst of Long Beach’s East Village Arts District. They bought three derelict, conjoined buildings sheathed in weathered wood siding, brick tile and stucco and became their own developer.
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MIXMAS Holiday Celebration at 4th + Linden

December 16, 2010 § Leave a comment

MIXMAS at 4th + Linden | Film Screening
Photo by EPK Photography

This past weekend Studio One Eleven’s  4th + Linden project hosted “MIXMAS – A Celebration of Community, Art & Culture.”   It was a great holiday party featuring live art-making, DJs and bands, outdoor film, food, gifts, and more.  Lyon Art Supply stayed open late and, with support from the LB Community Foundation Connected Corridor grant, seven community arts groups – including LB Creative, Lyon Art Supply, and Vayden Roi Galleries – banded together to host the event .  When we were working on designing the project, we always thought it would be a good place for a party – and it really was.  The rear parking lot was great for food carts and outdoor painting, films were screened in the large, unfinished space, and the indoor garage worked out well as a temporary gift store/music hall, which brought new meaning to the term “garage band.”  It was great seeing a diverse group come to the East Village to eat, listen to music, mingle with working artists, do a bit of holiday shopping, and just hang out together.  Our goal for redeveloping the 4th + Linden project was always about providing a place that nurtures our creative community and, with events like this and the impending opening of Fingerprints and Portfolio across the street, we feel we are well on the way.

More info can be found at lbcreative.org.
More photos by EPK Photography are viewable on flikr.

Sustainability Goes to Work in the East Village

November 2, 2010 § Leave a comment


Photo by EPK Photography

The East Village Creative Offices recently welcomed its latest tenant – local developer/contractor JR van Dijs, Inc. When designing the interiors, we maintained a focus on creating a sustainable workplace. By incorporating operable windows to capture ocean breezes, and operable skylights to exhaust hot air from the space, the design eliminated the need for air conditioning. The skylights and windows also contribute to the large amount of daylighting throughout the open office floor plan, so that only individual task or accent lighting is required during the day. This creates comfortable working conditions for the inhabitants, who have control over the indoor environment, and already commented that they feel healthier and happier working with a constant stream of fresh air and natural light. Jan Van Dijs, president of the company, is also happy – the improved environment means his employees are more productive and his energy bills are lower. Sustainability makes its way into the water fixtures, including the installation of dual-flush toilets, and into the interior walls, handrails, and stairs, which are composed of recycled lumber. Using these recycled materials creates a richer, more interesting workplace where the occupants feel good knowing they are minimizing their impact on the environment and contributing to the vitality of the community.

Check out more images of the JR Van Dijs Office on our website: www.studio-111.com


Photo by EPK Photography

(Even Kuma, the company dog, loves being in this space!)

Breaking Ground at the Ronald McDonald House

October 29, 2010 § Leave a comment

 

Long Beach Ronald McDonald House - Official Groundbreaking
Official groundbreaking with Ronald and friends

Long Beach Ronald McDonald House - Demolition
Demolition of the old apartment building

Long Beach Ronald McDonald House - Rendering
Rendering of the future Ronald McDonald House

This week construction started on the new Studio One Eleven-designed Long Beach Ronald McDonald House.  Ronald McDonald Houses (only peripherally connected to the fast food franchise) are places for families who have children requiring extended hospital care to stay.  Ours is adjacent to Miller Children’s Hospital on the Long Beach Memorial Medical Center campus.  The House was originally a 50’s apartment building that we are remodeling into a 23-room facility.  This is a great charity that does more than just provide families a place to stay during a time of illness (if that was the case, they could give out hotel vouchers to families for less money than it takes to build and operate a house).  The part of the house that is special is the sense of community and healing that families can participate in.  We hope our design, which features a series of communal gathering spaces and gardens, contributes to that purpose. With this being Long Beach, the theme chosen was “the Big Beach House,” which relates to the tranquility of the ocean, natural materials, and sense of serenity associated with living by the beach. The forms, textures, and colors we used in the remodel – including the landscape design, interiors, and graphics, which was done in-house by David Sabunas and others – try to capture that spirit.

Construction should take about 10 months. Check back frequently, as we’ll keep our site updated on how things shape up.

Back in Rehab

September 29, 2010 § Leave a comment

At Studio 111 we love to work on adaptive re-use projects. There’s something about re-purposing a derelict building that seems appropriate in this budget constrained, energy conscious age. And the texture, history and materials of older buildings just can’t be replicated with new construction. (Check-out the awesome Waterhouse Hotel in Shanghai in the September 2010 issue of Architectural Record – architects, trained to create new buildings, love something about ruin and decay as well). Our latest adaptive re-use project is the Continental Graphics Building rehabilitation on La Brea Boulevard in Los Angeles. Some of the materials and graphics of the project will play off the history of the site as one of LA’s premier printing shops, but the first phases of work are fairly straightforward – creating new storefronts and interiors (we’re collaborating with Mark Hershman from Shubin Donaldson) in order to re-purpose the buildings from light industrial to retail and/or creative offices. A lot of the construction is being done on spec, so the buildings are fairly neutral in order for the tenants to come in and provide a unique identity. And the whole vibe of the street, with American Rag, Volcom and Undefeated on the same block, is pretty low-key-cool. That’s a good thing, since the budgets are low-key too. Beyond the buildings themselves, our ultimate goal is seeing revitalized storefronts and tenants, new streetscaping (we’re working with Ahbe Landscape design) and pedestrian improvements and traffic calming occur so that this block transforms into a more walkable retail destination. And once that happens, extend the improvements both North and South. That may take some time, which is OK. We’re happy the first phases have begun. The contractor is Del Amo Construction (it’s a design-build project), and our client is developer Madison Marquette.

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