Long Beach Needs More Creative Office Space

March 26, 2012 § 2 Comments

We occasionally invite guests to contribute to our blog. This week, Toliver Morris – considered by many as the Long Beach Office Expert – has kindly shared his perspective on the need for more creative office space in Long Beach, CA. He and his family reside within the city, and he cares greatly about the community. Toliver can be contacted or followed via his informative website/blog at www.LongBeachOffice.net.

Cie Studios, Long Beach (Gensler, courtesy of Toliver Morris.)

As a commercial broker who focuses on helping companies with their office needs in Long Beach and surrounding areas, the question I’m asked most often is: “Is there any really cool, creative, loft-type space?”. Unfortunately, the answer too often is “no” or “very little”. The vast majority of office space in Long Beach (even in cool, old buildings) is boring, generic, uninspired, tired, “vanilla” space – blegh!

A relatively historic city for the West Coast, Long Beach could (and should) have an abundance of creative/tech space. Even traditional companies prefer interesting, cool office space over hum-drum vanilla, but creative companies absolutely require it. Creatives prefer to office in urban, safe, pedestrian environments with character and history, as well as numerous amenities. If executives and employees of those creative companies can live nearby, either in affordable urban or dynamic suburban enclaves, even better. Long Beach is the perfect place. Read more…

Sustainability Goes to Work in the East Village

November 2, 2010 § Leave a comment


Photo by EPK Photography

The East Village Creative Offices recently welcomed its latest tenant – local developer/contractor JR van Dijs, Inc. When designing the interiors, we maintained a focus on creating a sustainable workplace. By incorporating operable windows to capture ocean breezes, and operable skylights to exhaust hot air from the space, the design eliminated the need for air conditioning. The skylights and windows also contribute to the large amount of daylighting throughout the open office floor plan, so that only individual task or accent lighting is required during the day. This creates comfortable working conditions for the inhabitants, who have control over the indoor environment, and already commented that they feel healthier and happier working with a constant stream of fresh air and natural light. Jan Van Dijs, president of the company, is also happy – the improved environment means his employees are more productive and his energy bills are lower. Sustainability makes its way into the water fixtures, including the installation of dual-flush toilets, and into the interior walls, handrails, and stairs, which are composed of recycled lumber. Using these recycled materials creates a richer, more interesting workplace where the occupants feel good knowing they are minimizing their impact on the environment and contributing to the vitality of the community.

Check out more images of the JR Van Dijs Office on our website: www.studio-111.com


Photo by EPK Photography

(Even Kuma, the company dog, loves being in this space!)

Back in Rehab

September 29, 2010 § Leave a comment

At Studio 111 we love to work on adaptive re-use projects. There’s something about re-purposing a derelict building that seems appropriate in this budget constrained, energy conscious age. And the texture, history and materials of older buildings just can’t be replicated with new construction. (Check-out the awesome Waterhouse Hotel in Shanghai in the September 2010 issue of Architectural Record – architects, trained to create new buildings, love something about ruin and decay as well). Our latest adaptive re-use project is the Continental Graphics Building rehabilitation on La Brea Boulevard in Los Angeles. Some of the materials and graphics of the project will play off the history of the site as one of LA’s premier printing shops, but the first phases of work are fairly straightforward – creating new storefronts and interiors (we’re collaborating with Mark Hershman from Shubin Donaldson) in order to re-purpose the buildings from light industrial to retail and/or creative offices. A lot of the construction is being done on spec, so the buildings are fairly neutral in order for the tenants to come in and provide a unique identity. And the whole vibe of the street, with American Rag, Volcom and Undefeated on the same block, is pretty low-key-cool. That’s a good thing, since the budgets are low-key too. Beyond the buildings themselves, our ultimate goal is seeing revitalized storefronts and tenants, new streetscaping (we’re working with Ahbe Landscape design) and pedestrian improvements and traffic calming occur so that this block transforms into a more walkable retail destination. And once that happens, extend the improvements both North and South. That may take some time, which is OK. We’re happy the first phases have begun. The contractor is Del Amo Construction (it’s a design-build project), and our client is developer Madison Marquette.

4th + Linden in Architects Newspaper

August 25, 2010 § Leave a comment

 

4th+Linden in Architects Newspaper
Photo by EPK Photography

This month’s Architects Newspaper featured Studio One Eleven’s 4th + Linden project in an article about the resurgence of adaptive reuse.  Read the article below, or see the original version by clicking here.

Second Time is a Charm
August 4, 2010
By Sam Lubell and Lydia Lee

These days, the adaptive reuse of old offices, factories, and warehouses is simply the right thing to do. Tearing down and starting over is so 2007. More to the point, adaptive reuse is greener than any new sustainable building; and with the public clamoring for authenticity and governments handing out tax breaks and plan expediting, it makes significant financial sense, too. Not surprisingly, developers are embracing the reuse option, which has been a rare boon for architects. So while new building is still on life support, building from what already exists is having a heyday. For this year’s Developer’s Issue, AN turns a spotlight on eight inspired re-adaptions that extend good designs into designs to last even longer. 

Fourth and Linden
Architect: Studio One Eleven
Developer: East Village Partners
Location: Long Beach

The project, funded in part by a $350,000 facade-improvement grant from the city of Long Beach, subdivided a single derelict warehouse into three distinct buildings for office and condominium uses. With a beautiful frieze and other art deco highlights still intact, the trio complement each other while retaining their gritty, industrial character. Interiors are raw shells featuring exposed brick and block walls, concrete floors and wood truss ceilings with skylights. “When we bought the building it was drywall, carpet, gypsum, and drop ceilings,” said Studio One Eleven principal Michael Bohn. “We peeled all this away and discovered a beautiful patina.” To encourage interaction between tenants, a variety of landscaped outdoor spaces are incorporated into the project, including a shared courtyard with meeting space, a lushly landscaped paseo, and a parking court.

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